Back

The war cameraman

British journalist Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, on the right in this clip, was the lead cameraman for the 1915 film ‘With the Dardanelles Expedition’. With no film-making experience, but assisted by official Royal Navy photographer Ernest Brooks, Ashmead-Bartlett filmed British forces at Cape Helles and Anzacs in the area around Anzac Cove. From July to September 1915 he captured some of the most vivid combat footage of the First World War. In 1916 Ashmead-Bartlett gave lectures in the UK and Australia on his wartime experiences. This clip, from the weekly ‘Australian Gazette’ newsreel, shows him with an unidentified companion during his Australian lecture tour.

Year:1916

Location:Melbourne and Sydney, Australia

See someone you know? Email us

Close

The war cameraman

British journalist Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, on the right in this clip, was the lead cameraman for the 1915 film ‘With the Dardanelles Expedition’. With no film-making experience, but assisted by official Royal Navy photographer Ernest Brooks, Ashmead-Bartlett filmed British forces at Cape Helles and Anzacs in the area around Anzac Cove. From July to September 1915 he captured some of the most vivid combat footage of the First World War. In 1916 Ashmead-Bartlett gave lectures in the UK and Australia on his wartime experiences. This clip, from the weekly ‘Australian Gazette’ newsreel, shows him with an unidentified companion during his Australian lecture tour.


Year: 1916

Length: 03:38

Production Company: Australasian Films

Credits: Australasian Films

Source: National Film and Sound Archive of Australia

Catalogue Reference: NFSA title: 40451


People: ​Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett

Location: Melbourne and Sydney, Australia

Tags: Australian Gazette, Australiasian Films, ​Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett, Charles Bean


Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett was a British war correspondent working for The Daily Telegraph and covered the 25 April 1915 landing at Anzac Cove. He had gone ashore on the evening of the landing, providing the first eyewitness accounts. His report was published in Australian newspapers on 8 May, before the reports of the official Australian war correspondent, C.E.W. Bean. Through his reporting of the Battle of Gallipoli, Ashmead-Bartlett was instrumental in the birth of the Anzac legend. He was outspoken in his criticism of the conduct of the campaign.

Close

The war cameraman

  • Melbourne and Sydney, Australia

  • 0:00

    Intertitle: SYDNEY. Mr E. Ashmead Bartlett, who has come to tell us of the Anzacs’ immortal deeds at Gallipoli

  • 0:06

    E. Ashmead Bartlett (r) and another man talk informally in front of a building